Top 10 Theories about the Lost City of Atlantis



 Top 10 Theories about the Lost City of Atlantis


 

After the acclaimed Greek thinker Plato first composed of a legendary mainland called Atlantis more than two thousand years prior, researchers have been secured savage civil argument in respect to whether such a spot genuinely existed. While a couple of uncommon people have considered Plato's words important, most laugh at the thought that a progressed human advancement could vanish as totally as though it had never existed. Such is a bit like envisioning an elephant could stroll through a snowdrift without leaving foot shaped impressions, making it not entirely obvious the whole subject and discount it so far an alternate case of New Age pseudo-science or, best case scenario, a fabulous and generally faulty tale. Also this is not an irrational position either. Truth be told, Plato portrayed the spot as being as substantial as Libya (an old term for North Africa) and Asia joined, making one sensibly sure it ought to be difficult to miss. But then nobody has figured out how to deliver to the extent that a coral reef that may have denoted its antiquated shoreline, substantially less a whole submerged mainland. Yet the hunt proceeds and, if anything, gives off an impression of being developing in both scale and complexity until today it has gotten to be something of an innovative/authentic heavenly vessel for the twenty-first century. Did Atlantis exist, and on the off chance that it did, where might it be able to have been? While nobody can answer that question with any level of conviction however some endeavor to—there are truly a couple of contending speculations out there to consider. Some of them are more conceivable than others—and a couple of even have some backing from established researchers however every one of them are simply surmises. So now, instantly, here is my rundown, in no specific request, of the main ten hypotheses with respect to the lost landmass of Atlantis.

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10.  Accounts of Atlantis are fictional

The conventional position kept up by most researchers and history specialists throughout the years is that Plato's record of a fantastically well off city as told in the Critias and Timaeus was only an anecdotal story intended to both enliven and edify his perusers as to the dangers of hubris and failing the divine beings, and was never proposed to...

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9.  Atlantis was fictional but the accounts of a world-wide Deluge were true

Plato makes various references to an extraordinary downpour happening a huge number of years before his time that decimated practically the entire world, leaving just a small piece of humankind left to repopulate the globe and begin development once more. The story of Atlantis, then, while itself a sign of Plato's rich creative energy, may have bee...

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8.  Atlantis was a continent that existed in the mid-Atlantic as was destroyed by natural catastrophes

For the purest, this remains the traditional understanding and the one originally postulated by nineteenth century writer and Atlantisphile Ignatius Donnelly in his 1882 book, Atlantis, the Antediluvian World, who imagined the Atlantic Ocean to be no more than a few hundred feet deep and prone to occasional vertical shifting. Since so little was kn...

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7.  Plato was referring to the ancient Minoans and the explosion of the volcanic island of Thera

An increasingly popular theory concerning the true nature of Atlantis—and one that has some acceptance within the scientific community—is that Plato was referring to a people native to the modern Greek island of Crete known as the Minoans, who were largely wiped out when the nearby volcanic island of Thera (known today as Santorini) erupted in ...

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6.  Atlantis was a mythical retelling of the Black Sea flood

An alternate hypothesis that has been as of late hypothesized and again has some backing among researchers is that Atlantis and the "incredible Deluge" recounted by Plato was a mythologized record of an alternate authentic occasion that occurred a great many years before Plato was conceived: the rupturing of the Bosporus by the Mediterran...

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5.  Atlantis was referring to a more temperate Antarctica

The dubious recommendation by the late Charles Hapgood that the Earth's hull may have all of a sudden moved practically twelve thousand years back (he kept up that the Earth's covering buoys upon a magma of liquid rock like the skin of an orange and intermittently moves through the centuries because of underground and gravitational weights) has go...

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4.  Atlantis was a reference to an ancient continent called Lemuria

Interestingly, the Greeks were not the only ones to maintain a belief in an ancient, island-bound civilization. India and the Asian continent have their own tradition, which they call Lemuria—an island civilization that supposedly existed in the Indian Ocean. The idea that such a place existed was first postulated by 19th century zoologist Philip...

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3.  Atlantis was actually the mythological land of Mu

Mu is the name of a speculative landmass that supposedly existed in either the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean, contingent upon who you listen to. In either case, it was thought to have vanished at the beginning of mankind's history, its survivors emigrating to different landmasses to serve as the establishment for various later developments all through ...

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2.  Atlantis was in Southeast Asia

On the off chance that one takes a gander at the geology of the planet at the tallness of the last Ice Age, they will recognize the sea levels were in excess of two hundred feet lower then as a consequence of so much water being taken up in the huge ice sheets that secured the majority of North America and Europe. As being what is indicated, you ca...

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1.  Atlantis was in the Bahamas, Bermuda, the Azores, Canary Islands, etc.

The thought that Plato was alluding to a spot in the Atlantic does not pass on effectively, thus almost any island or area mass lying anyplace between east shore of the Americas and Europe/Africa has been proposed as the region for Plato's fabulous landmass. Sadly, none of these islands are especially great in extension or size, nor do any of them ...

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